We accept virtually all insurance and
provide special pricing for uninsured patients.
05/17/2018 Categories: Addiction Alcohol rehabilitation

Inpatient Detox Rehab for Patients With Severe Alcohol Withdrawal

Alcohol detox and withdrawal can be a difficult process. Future Now Detox makes the journey easier. As West Palm Beach’s best inpatient drug rehab center, we offer comprehensive treatment and support for severe alcohol withdrawal. We can help you get and stay clean and sober.

Can You Get Withdrawal From Alcohol?

Many people who drink too much think that they’re not addicts. After all, we live in a culture that glorifies alcohol use. Eighty percent of Americans drink at least occasionally. And of the 50% who drink regularly, 25% report regular binge drinking. Alcohol use and even abuse are both normal. They’re also legal, which means people can use and abuse alcohol without legal consequences. This makes it easier to conceal alcohol abuse and to convince yourself that alcohol abuse is unlike drug abuse.

The reality is that alcohol is one of the world’s most addictive drugs. It’s even more addictive because of its legal status. Readily available in convenience stores, grocery stores, and even at churches across the nation, alcohol is difficult to avoid. No wonder Americans are drinking themselves to death at unprecedented rates. Alcohol claims an average of more than 30,000 lives each year. If we factor in indirect deaths, such as those due to liver failure or heart disease, the alcohol death toll is well over 100,000 people.

Alcohol is addictive, dangerous, and even deadly. Severe alcohol withdrawal can even cause a life-threatening condition called delirium tremens (DT). DT can cause seizures, hallucinations, and even loss of consciousness. With proper management, it’s possible to get through alcohol withdrawal and achieve lasting sobriety.

Alcohol Withdrawal: How Long Does it Take?

alcohol detox
Our clients often ask us how long it takes to withdraw from alcohol addiction. The answer is as unique as each person addicted to alcohol. The timeline to detox from alcohol varies from person to person. It depends on a wide range of factors, including:

  • How long you’ve been an alcoholic.
  • How frequently you drink.
  • Your overall health.
  • Whether you use other drugs along with alcohol.
  • The quality of support and detox care you receive.

What is Alcohol Withdrawal and What Causes It?

Alcohol abuse is a medical disorder that comes in predictable stages. Withdrawal, sometimes called detox is the first stage of recovery. It’s also a part of the disease that keeps many addicts trapped in a cycle of withdrawal and dependency.

So what is alcohol withdrawal anyway? When the body and brain become dependent on alcohol or other substances, they begin treating those substances like food or water, as if they are necessary to remain alive. So when you stop drinking, the body violently revolts. This is called withdrawal. During withdrawal, cravings for alcohol become intense. Because the body is convinced that it needs alcohol to remain alive, it may even become il. The good news is that symptoms of alcohol withdrawal are short-lived.

The good news about withdrawal is that it’s a sign that alcohol is leaving your body. As your body flushes this poison out, symptoms intensify. Once alcohol is completely gone from the body, symptoms tend to reach their crescendo. Within a few days, they decline dramatically. From there, recovery is less about coping with physical withdrawal, and more about finding new ways to manage stress, resist temptation and remember that alcohol will never again be a solution to life’s difficulties.

How Long After Quitting Drinking Until Alcohol Withdrawal Begins?

The amount of time it takes for withdrawal to begin is heavily dependent on how frequently and often you drink. Withdrawal typically begins after the body notices it hasn’t gotten its usual dose of alcohol. Symptoms continue to intensify for several days thereafter.

For most addicts, intense cravings begin within a few hours of quitting drinking. The symptoms usually peak at three or four days and can last for a week or two. After that, you may experience cravings, but they will be significantly less intense and will be less likely to make you sick. Over time, as you become accustomed to life without alcohol, your body forgets its need for this drug–but only if you get help to develop new coping skills.

Withdrawal From Alcohol Symptoms

Alcohol withdrawal symptoms range from minor to severe, and in some cases can even become life-threatening. The intensity and severity of symptoms generally correlate to the intensity and severity of the addiction. People who have used and abused alcohol for many years are more likely to experience painful withdrawal symptoms. People who have health issues as a result of alcohol abuse, such as cirrhosis or liver failure, may experience additional complications. So it’s important to consult with a skilled medical provider or detox specialist before quitting alcohol.

Mild to moderate alcohol withdrawal symptoms often include:

  • Headaches, muscle pain, and a sense of being unwell.
  • Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.
  • Difficulty sleeping.
  • Nightmares.
  • Night Sweats.
  • Anxiety and depression.
  • Aggressive, angry or suicidal thoughts.
  • A strong urge to drink.
  • The false belief that life is not worth living without alcohol, or that the only thing that made life tolerable was alcohol.
  • Difficulty concentrating.

Some people develop more serious alcohol withdrawal symptoms that may include:

  • Excessive vomiting.
  • Dehydration.
  • Aggressive behavior.
  • Hallucinations and delusions.

Some people develop a serious condition called delirium tremens. It usually begins about three days into withdrawal and lasts about two days. It can cause shaking, irregular heartbeat, confusion, and even loss of consciousness. In most cases, symptoms pass on their own. In some people, however, symptoms can become severe or life-threatening. This is more likely if you have used alcohol for many years, or if alcoholism has led to other chronic health issues.

What Happens After Alcohol Detox is Over?

Detox is merely the process by which alcohol leaves the body and the body adjusts to its absence. It’s not the end of addiction. Addiction fundamentally alters the way your brain and body respond to alcohol. It changes your body chemistry and your brain such that even a single drink may reignite the addiction.

Simply put: once you’ve been an addict, you will continue to be at risk for addiction. Indeed, relapse is considered a symptom of the disease of addiction. Most addicts relapse at least once. That can be discouraging, but it’s important to understand the process. With each attempt at sobriety, you get better at getting sober. So relapse is just a temporary road bump. It does not have to be an end to the quest for sobriety.

Nevertheless, most people in recovery want to avoid relapsing. That takes effort and support. Once you’ve gotten alcohol out of your system, you’ll need to embrace a new way of sober living. This requires you to master new skills, including:

  • Finding alternative ways to cope with stress that don’t involve the use of alcohol.
  • Finding a replacement for your alcohol habit. Many people in recovery find that a new healthy “addiction,” such as running or gardening can reduce their desire for alcohol.
  • Maintaining a sense of perspective about how alcohol has affected your life. With distance, it’s possible to begin romanticizing your time as an alcoholic. Try keeping a list of all the negative ways alcohol affected your life. Consult it when you feel a craving.
  • Avoiding people and places that used to tempt you to use alcohol. Many addicts find that much of their life grows to center around alcohol abuse. You might need to make new friends, find new hobbies, and discover new places to hang out.
  • Tending to your health. Seeing your body repair from the damage of alcohol abuse is one of the strongest incentives to stay sober.

How the Best Inpatient Rehab Centers Help You Detox From Alcohol

Future Now Detox is West Palm Beach’s premier provider of drug and alcohol detox. What sets us and other quality addiction recovery centers apart is our commitment to a continuum of care. The journey isn’t just about detox. It’s about radically changing your life, to help you heal in body, mind, and spirit so you can achieve a lifetime of sobriety.

We offer NAD/Brain Restoration+ intravenous detox drips. NAD is a naturally occurring coenzyme that plays a key role in cellular metabolism. When NAD is depleted, so too is the body. People may feel weak, get sick more easily, or suffer from poor mental health.

Low levels of NAD are common in addicts. Addiction further depletes NAD, and alcohol withdrawal can exacerbate this already dire situation. Our intravenous NAD drips deliver a customized NAD dose directly to your bloodstream, offering rapid relief from the painful symptoms of detox and withdrawal. Many of our patients find that they immediately feel a surge of energy, and that their desire to use drops dramatically, or disappears entirely.

We walk alongside addicts well beyond just helping them detox. We see detox as just the beginning of the journey. We also offer a wide range of complementary modalities, including massage care and chiropractic. Patients receive immersive therapies, group support, and nutrition counseling, as well as daily chef-prepared meals that are rich in probiotics to restore gut health. We also offer customized vitamin IV infusions to help restore the body and mind to optimal health.

Every person in our care is an individual. So we offer individualized services to help each client get their lives back on track so they can move forward into existences of purpose and meaning.

Sobriety: A Lifelong Journey

You might have heard that you’ll always have cravings for alcohol. That’s not true. The right treatment can restore you to fullness and wholeness, helping you find new ways to live that eliminate your need for alcohol. But it takes time. Sobriety is a lifelong journey that requires support. We prepare you to take that journey with comprehensive assistance and life skills that will help you lead a joyful life free of alcohol and drugs.

Tips for Choosing an Inpatient Alcohol Detox Center

If you’re ready to begin your sober living journey, you need to choose an excellent community that can help you get sober once and for all. Your goal should be to choose a facility that offers comprehensive support, and that deeply understands the disease of addiction.

Future Now Detox offers clinically validated alcohol withdrawal addiction therapy. We help you get and stay sober, and we accept most insurance. No matter which alcohol withdrawal and detox rehab center you choose, ask plenty of questions. Here are some that can get you started:

  • What does detox look like? What do you do to support the process?
  • How long does alcohol withdrawal take?
  • How long does treatment take?
  • If I relapse, can I come back?
  • What other therapies do you offer?
  • What is the length of the average stay?
  • How much does treatment cost?
  • Do you accept insurance?
  • What do the living quarters look like?
  • Do you have doctors or other medical professionals on staff?
  • What steps do you take to protect patients’ health and safety?
  • Do you work with co-occurring disorders?

At Future Now Detox, we say yes when other facilities say no. You’re never beyond hope. We can help. Let us show you a path out of the darkness and into the light. Alcohol withdrawal and sobriety is possible, no matter how long you’ve been addicted, how many times you’ve relapsed, or how hopeless you feel. Call us today!

Inpatient Detox Rehab for Patients With Severe Alcohol Withdrawal

Alcohol detox and withdrawal can be a difficult process. Future Now Detox makes the journey easier. As West Palm Beach’s best inpatient drug rehab center, we offer comprehensive treatment and support for severe alcohol withdrawal. We can help you get and stay clean and sober.

Can You Get Withdrawal From Alcohol?

Many people who drink too much think that they’re not addicts. After all, we live in a culture that glorifies alcohol use. Eighty percent of Americans drink at least occasionally. And of the 50% who drink regularly, 25% report regular binge drinking. Alcohol use and even abuse are both normal. They’re also legal, which means people can use and abuse alcohol without legal consequences. This makes it easier to conceal alcohol abuse, and to convince yourself that alcohol abuse is unlike drug abuse.

The reality is that alcohol is one of the world’s most addictive drugs. It’s even more addictive because of its legal status. Readily available in convenience stores, grocery stores, and even at churches across the nation, alcohol is difficult to avoid. No wonder Americans are drinking themselves to death at unprecedented rates. Alcohol claims an average of more than 30,000 lives each year. If we factor in indirect deaths, such as those due to liver failure or heart disease, the alcohol death toll is well over 100,000 people.

Alcohol is addictive, dangerous, and even deadly. Severe alcohol withdrawal can even cause a life-threatening condition called delirium tremens (DT). DT can cause seizures, hallucinations, and even loss of consciousness. With proper management, it’s possible to get through alcohol withdrawal and achieve lasting sobriety.

Alcohol Withdrawal: How Long Does it Take?

Our clients often ask us how long it takes to withdraw from alcohol addiction. The answer is as unique as each person addicted to alcohol. The timeline to detox from alcohol varies from person to person. It depends on a wide range of factors, including:

How long you’ve been an alcoholic.
How frequently you drink.
Your overall health.
Whether you use other drugs along with alcohol.
The quality of support and detox care you receive.

What is Alcohol Withdrawal and What Causes It?

Alcohol abuse is a medical disorder that comes in predictable stages. Withdrawal, sometimes called detox is the first stage of recovery. It’s also a part of the disease that keeps many addicts trapped in a cycle of withdrawal and dependency.

So what is alcohol withdrawal anyway?

When the body and brain become dependent on alcohol or other substances, they begin treating those substances like food or water, as if they are necessary to remain alive. So when you stop drinking, the body violently revolts. This is called withdrawal. During withdrawal, cravings for alcohol become intense. Because the body is convinced that it needs alcohol to remain alive, it may even become il. The good news is that symptoms of alcohol withdrawal are short-lived.
The good news about withdrawal is that it’s a sign that alcohol is leaving your body. As your body flushes this poison out, symptoms intensify. Once alcohol is completely gone from the body, symptoms tend to reach their crescendo. Within a few days, they decline dramatically. From there, recovery is less about coping with physical withdrawal, and more about finding new ways to manage stress, resist temptation and remember that alcohol will never again be a solution to life’s difficulties.

How Long After Quitting Drinking Until Alcohol Withdrawal Begins?

The amount of time it takes for withdrawal to begin is heavily dependent on how frequently and often you drink. Withdrawal typically begins after the body notices it hasn’t gotten its usual dose of alcohol. Symptoms continue to intensify for several days thereafter.

For most addicts, intense cravings begin within a few hours of quitting drinking. The symptoms usually peak at three or four days and can last for a week or two. After that, you may experience cravings, but they will be significantly less intense and will be less likely to make you sick. Over time, as you become accustomed to life without alcohol, your body forgets its need for this drug–but only if you get help to develop new coping skills.

Withdrawal From Alcohol Symptoms
Alcohol withdrawal symptoms range from minor to severe, and in some cases can even become life-threatening. The intensity and severity of symptoms generally correlate to the intensity and severity of the addiction. People who have used and abused alcohol for many years are more likely to experience painful withdrawal symptoms. People who have health issues as a result of alcohol abuse, such as cirrhosis or liver failure, may experience additional complications. So it’s important to consult with a skilled medical provider or detox specialist before quitting alcohol.

Mild to moderate alcohol withdrawal symptoms often include:

Headaches, muscle pain, and a sense of being unwell.
Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.
Difficulty sleeping.
Nightmares.
Night Sweats.
Anxiety and depression.
Aggressive, angry or suicidal thoughts.
A strong urge to drink.
The false belief that life is not worth living without alcohol, or that the only thing that made life tolerable was alcohol.
Difficulty concentrating.

Some people develop more serious alcohol withdrawal symptoms that may include:

Excessive vomiting.
Dehydration.
Aggressive behavior.
Hallucinations and delusions.

Some people develop a serious condition called delirium tremens. It usually begins about three days into withdrawal and lasts about two days. It can cause shaking, irregular heartbeat, confusion, and even loss of consciousness. In most cases, symptoms pass on their own. In some people, however, symptoms can become severe or life-threatening. This is more likely if you have used alcohol for many years, or if alcoholism has led to other chronic health issues.

What Happens After Alcohol Detox is Over?

Detox is merely the process by which alcohol leaves the body and the body adjusts to its absence. It’s not the end of addiction. Addiction fundamentally alters the way your brain and body respond to alcohol. It changes your body chemistry and your brain such that even a single drink may reignite the addiction.
Simply put: once you’ve been an addict, you will continue to be at risk for addiction. Indeed, relapse is considered a symptom of the disease of addiction. Most addicts relapse at least once. That can be discouraging, but it’s important to understand the process. With each attempt at sobriety, you get better at getting sober. So relapse is just a temporary road bump. It does not have to be an end to the quest for sobriety.

Nevertheless, most people in recovery want to avoid relapsing. That takes effort and support. Once you’ve gotten alcohol out of your system, you’ll need to embrace a new way of sober living. This requires you to master new skills, including:

Finding alternative ways to cope with stress that don’t involve the use of alcohol.
Finding a replacement for your alcohol habit. Many people in recovery find that a new healthy “addiction,” such as running or gardening can reduce their desire for alcohol.
Maintaining a sense of perspective about how alcohol has affected your life. With distance, it’s possible to begin romanticizing your time as an alcoholic. Try keeping a list of all the negative ways alcohol affected your life. Consult it when you feel a craving.
Avoiding people and places that used to tempt you to use alcohol. Many addicts find that much of their life grows to center around alcohol abuse. You might need to make new friends, find new hobbies, and discover new places to hang out.
Tending to your health. Seeing your body repair from the damage of alcohol abuse is one of the strongest incentives to stay sober.

How the Best Inpatient Rehab Centers Help You Detox From Alcohol

Future Now Detox is West Palm Beach’s premier provider of drug and alcohol detox. What sets us and other quality addiction recovery centers apart is our commitment to a continuum of care. The journey isn’t just about detox. It’s about radically changing your life, to help you heal in body, mind, and spirit so you can achieve a lifetime of sobriety.

We offer NAD/Brain Restoration+ intravenous detox drips. NAD is a naturally occurring coenzyme that plays a key role in cellular metabolism. When NAD is depleted, so too is the body. People may feel weak, get sick more easily, or suffer from poor mental health.

Low levels of NAD are common in addicts. Addiction further depletes NAD, and alcohol withdrawal can exacerbate this already dire situation. Our intravenous NAD drips deliver a customized NAD dose directly to your bloodstream, offering rapid relief from the painful symptoms of detox and withdrawal. Many of our patients find that they immediately feel a surge of energy and that their desire to use drops dramatically, or disappears entirely.

We walk alongside addicts well beyond just helping them detox. We see detox as just the beginning of the journey. We also offer a wide range of complementary modalities, including massage care and chiropractic. Patients receive immersive therapies, group support, and nutrition counseling, as well as daily chef-prepared meals that are rich in probiotics to restore gut health. We also offer customized vitamin IV infusions to help restore the body and mind to optimal health.

Every person in our care is an individual. So we offer individualized services to help each client get their lives back on track so they can move forward into existences of purpose and meaning.

Sobriety: A Lifelong Journey
You might have heard that you’ll always have cravings for alcohol. That’s not true. The right treatment can restore you to fullness and wholeness, helping you find new ways to live that eliminate your need for alcohol. But it takes time. Sobriety is a lifelong journey that requires support. We prepare you to take that journey with comprehensive assistance and life skills that will help you lead a joyful life free of alcohol and drugs.

Tips for Choosing an Inpatient Alcohol Detox Center
If you’re ready to begin your sober living journey, you need to choose an excellent community that can help you get sober once and for all. Your goal should be to choose a facility that offers comprehensive support, and that deeply understands the disease of addiction.

Future Now Detox offers clinically validated alcohol withdrawal addiction therapy. We help you get and stay sober, and we accept most insurance. No matter which alcohol withdrawal and detox rehab center you choose, ask plenty of questions. Here are some that can get you started:

What does detox look like? What do you do to support the process?
How long does alcohol withdrawal take?
How long does treatment take?
If I relapse, can I come back?
What other therapies do you offer?
What is the length of the average stay?
How much does treatment cost?
Do you accept insurance?
What do the living quarters look like?
Do you have doctors or other medical professionals on staff?
What steps do you take to protect patients’ health and safety?
Do you work with co-occurring disorders?

At Future Now Detox, we say yes when other facilities say no. You’re never beyond hope. We can help. Let us show you a path out of the darkness and into the light. Alcohol withdrawal and sobriety is possible, no matter how long you’ve been addicted, how many times you’ve relapsed, or how hopeless you feel. Call us today!

Get a Free Consultation

Call us or fill the form below